The eight-toothed spruce bark beetle (Ips typographus) also known as the European spruce bark beetle, large spruce bark beetle and larger eight-toothed spruce bark beetle.

It is the most serious and destructive pest of spruce species in its Eurasian range.

Adult females lay eggs along a linear gallery system from which larval galleries radiate, becoming wider as the larvae grow. The pattern shows in the bark and in the surface of the wood, and is unique to Ips typographus. This symptom should be looked for in any dead trees, whether standing or fallen.


The beetle is often associated with windblown, damaged and recently felled spruce trees, where it builds up numbers before moving on to attack adjacent live trees. Inspection of trees in this category should be a priority. Look also for individual or groups of dead trees. This arises when the beetles ‘mass attack’ trees, overcoming the trees’ usual defences by a combination of large numbers and a blue stain fungus carried by adults. This phase can lead to extensive tree deaths.

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